Nixie Clock
Operating Instructions

After you download the software (Click here to do so), save the downloaded file "setup.exe" to your desk top, then run it.

When Setup runs follow the simple prompts to install the clock program on your computer.

Important: If you are using Windows™ 7 or Vista™ or higher Click Here for special instructions before running the clock.

Checking for the Correct Time Zone

Before you run NixieClock you need to check to see if your computer has the correct Time Zone setting. Depending on how your computer was initially set up, the local time zone setting in your computer may be incorrect even though the time displayed by the clock on the Windows™ task bar seems correct.

Because Microsoft headquarters is located in the state of Washington, the default time zone for the Windows™ operating system is Pacific Standard Time (PST). Some computers, in other time zones, have had their clocks set to the correct local time but the time zone is still set to PST. This can cause problems in setting and running a multiple time zone application such as NixieClock.

    To check and, if necessary, set your time zone to the correct one:
  • Click on the "Start" button.
  • Select "Settings"
  • Select "Control Panel"
  • Double-click the "Date/Time" icon
The exact appearance and function of "Date/Time Properties" box will vary slightly depending on exactly which version of the Windows™ operating system you are using.

Check to see that the Time Zone selected is the one used where you live. If you're not sure of the time zone in your area, Click Here.

NixieClock Settings

Click Here to Dowload the Software Once you have your computer set correctly you're ready to run NixieClock for the first time. When you do, you will see a window, similar to the one at left, with three clocks. The time displayed initally will be the time your computer is currently set to display. (We'll be setting your computer to JägAir time shortly).

The top clock display (clock #1) will show Coordinated Universal Time. JITT, like other scientific time-keeping establishments, uses Co-ordinated Universal Time (abbreviated UTC) as its time scale. This time, also sometimes known as "GMT" or "Zulu" time, uses a 24 hour clock and is 5 hours "ahead" of Eastern Standard Time (+4 vs. Eastern Daylight Time).

The middle display (#2) will show Local Time according to your computer settings and the bottom display of the three(#3) will be displaying UTC like clock #1.

If you're still reading down this far, you probably want to "tinker" with the settings and, perhaps more importantly, enable the feature that will set your computer's clock to JägAir time. The Display Settings are accessed by left-clicking anywhere on the displays or right-clicking and selecting "Display Setup".

When you do so, this admittingly intimidating settings window will appear:
(Hang in there! It's really pretty simple...)


Individual Clock Settings

Most of the "real estate" of this window is taken up by three identical settings panels, one for each of the clock displays. The clocks are numbered from top to bottom 1,2,3.

"Label" allows you to type in the caption that is displayed just above each clock display.
"Display Hours" selects a 12 hour format or 24-hour "military time" format.

"Time Zone" gives you 4 choices for setting the hour displayed.
  • UTC - Co-ordinated Universal Time
  • Computer Local - The time zone you have set in your computer.
  • UTC Offset - UTC plus or minus the number of hours you set.
  • Local Offset - Your computer's local time plus or minus the number of hours you set.
The latter two choices have one important difference.
UTC and, by extension, UTC Offset do not observe Daylight Savings time.
Local Offset does, if your local time zone does.

An example:

You live in Camp Dennison, OH and your local time zone is Eastern (Daylight) Time.
If you wanted to set one of your clocks to display Los Angeles, CA time [Pacific (Daylight) Time] use Local Offset with a difference of "-3". Your Los Angeles Clock will then be correct year round with the changes to and from Daylight savings time.
If, however, you wanted to set a clock to Phoenix, AZ, where Daylight time is not observed, use UTC Offset with the difference set to -7 to display Mountain Standard time year-round.

The final individual clock setting, "Type" Selects one of four display types:

  • - Nixie
  • - LED
  • - Vacuum Florescent
  • - Numitron

Displaying the Clocks

This portion of the NixieClock setup panel selects how many of the three clocks are displayed.

...and Now: The Best Part:

"Internet" - Select "On" and NixieClock will use the Internet to synchronize your computer's clock to the JägAir Institute's time server. This action uses a procedure called the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) to set your computer's clock with split-second accuracy.

For best results, you should connect to the Internet before starting NixieClock. The program attempts to sync when it is first started and at random intervals thereafter. Successful synchronization is indicated when the red dot labeled "JägAir Sync" in the upper right of the main display turns green.

The clock will also tell you the amount of the last correction. Hover your mouse cursor over the "black space" surrounding the clock digits and the indication will appear.

> "Internet" - Select "On" and NixieClock will use the Internet to synchronize your computer's clock to the JägAir Institute's time server. This action uses a procedure called the Simple Network Time Protocol (SNTP) to set your computer's clock with split-second accuracy.

For best results, you should connect to the Internet before starting NixieClock. The program attempts to sync when it is first started and at random intervals thereafter. Successful synchronization is indicated when the red dot labeled "JägAir Sync" in the upper right of the main display turns green.

The clock will also tell you the amount of the last correction. Hover your mouse cursor over the "black space" surrounding the clock digits and the indication will appear.